Colors
 
Bushnell H2O Waterproof/Fogproof Roof Prism Binocular, 8 x 42-mm, Black
By Leonuk On 21 Dec, 2013 At 01:25 PM | Categorized As Boats & Boating | With 2 Comments

{Chat2day} Bushnell H2O Waterproof/Fogproof Roof Prism Binocular, 8 x 42-mm, Black

Bushnell H2O Waterproof/Fogproof Roof Prism Binocular, 8 x 42-mm, Black

Bushnell H2O Waterproof/Fogproof Roof Prism Binocular, 8 x 42-mm, Black

  • 100% waterproof, O-ring sealed and nitrogen purged for reliable, fog-free performance
  • BaK-4 prisms and multi-coated optics offer crisp clear images with improved light transmission
  • Non-slip rubber armor and Soft Texture Grip absorbs shock and provides a firm grip
  • 8x magnification and 42mm objective diameter; 12-foot close focus distance; 17mm eye relief
  • Large center-focus knob for easy adjustments; Twist-up eyecups; Limited lifetime warranty

Spend enough time on the water, and your equipment will spend some time in it. That’s why Bushnell had the foresight to build the H20 series of binoculars, which are O-ring-sealed and nitrogen-purged to complete lock out moisture should you spill water on the housing, take your binoculars overboard, or simply run into foul weather along the way. The H20 binoculars feature rubber armoring with textured pads to give you a sturdy grip in slippery situations. More significantly, the binoculars’ mult

List Price: $ 141.95

Price:

About -

Displaying 3 Comments
Have Your Say
  1. Alan S Fask says:
    143 of 147 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Bushnell H2O Roof 8×42 Binos, April 23, 2013
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Bushnell H2O Waterproof/Fogproof Roof Prism Binocular (Electronics)

    This review is for the Bushnell H2O Roof Binoculars sizes 8×42 and 10×42, both of which I recently purchased. These binoculars are inexpensive but have many of the characteristics of expensive binoculars. They are water and fog-proof, they have BaK-4 prisms, and they have a well-constructed and rugged body. I purchased roofs rather than porros after my Nikon porros lost their collimation. Nikon repaired them for $10 plus shipping (which was very fair), but I did not want to go through that again. Roofs are generally more durable. These binos appear well collimated (I did every test I could find on the internet, including shining the sun through them onto a screen), they can quickly be focused quite sharply, and there is very little color aberration. The 8x42s have remarkably little distortion near the outside of the field of vision; the 10x42s have more, but are still quite acceptable. The eye relief is good, so I can wear these with or without glasses. The rubber eyepiece collars are a little hard, but I purchased Field Optics eyeshields (I have no interest in the company) which both shield outside light from entering from the sides and soften the feel of the binoculars against the eyes. Both binos feel slightly heavy for their size, but are really okay. The straps require some lacing, but if carefully done, are okay too. The case is slightly tight, but acceptable. The front and rear lens covers can be attached, which is great.

    The biggest problem with these binos is that they are roof binoculars with only multicoating. They are not fully multicoated nor phase coated. The lens quality is good, but not great. Thus the images are clear and sharp, but not as bright as you might get with a porro of the same class or an expensive roof bino. In good daytime light, this does not matter, but in really overcast light, the view is acceptable, but could be better. Not surprisingly, the 8x42s are brighter than the 10x42s. However, at night, using a tripod, I prefer the 10x42s since they permit better viewing of the moon and the stars. Surprisingly, the focus is so sharp that I can produce pinpoint images of Jupiter without flaring.

    Thus we have inexpensive binoculars pretending to be expensive binoculars and doing a pretty good job of deception. The muted brightness is only a problem in poor lighting, but otherwise these binoculars are impressive for their price. I give the 10x42s four stars and the 8x42s four and a half stars.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  2. Edward III "Alpha Sixx" says:
    68 of 75 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Very well made!, October 4, 2012
    By 
    Edward III “Alpha Sixx” (Military/ all over the world) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    I opened the box pulled these Bino’s out and the 1st thing I noticed was how heavy, solid and well built they are. I love their size they are not too large, they are a very manageable size. They are not fit in your pocket small but they are just right. It only took a few seconds to get them adjusted and focused out of the box. They have a really nice thick canvas carrying case. The pieces that cover the end lenses are thick rubber that closely attached to the Binos so you don’t have to worry about losing them and they are not at all in the way. The caps that cover the front lenses are one piece of thick rubber that will easily fit in your pocket if you are on the go. I’ve been in the Army 12 years and everything I buy I try to make sure it can take a beating through all my field training, moves or deployments and these Bino’s def pass the test.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No

  3. Graves says:
    64 of 74 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Solidly made, light to carry but not as comfortable as I’d have liked, July 2, 2012
    By 
    Graves (Pennsylvania) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    This review is from: Bushnell H2O Waterproof/Fogproof Roof Prism Binocular (Electronics)
    Customer review from the Amazon Vine Program (What’s this?)

    For several years I have a pair of very good, very high power Minolta binoculars but they are a bit on the large side so given the chance to test out a smaller, more compact version I was eager to have a go and promptly received the set of Bushnell’s.

    They come in a small, slightly padded pouch that has a small internal pocket for other items and most importantly a slot so these can be carried on a belt, freeing you up from having to always carry them on a cord around your neck and look like Irwin Rommel. It does comes with a strap you can attach to the binoculars themselves if you want to look like Rommel and in all fairness this is probably a good thing to have when you have them out to save you from dropping them, but there doesn’t need to be a strap around your neck all the time.

    They were about 2/3rd the size of the large Minoltas and weighted as less than half the weight. So smaller lighter, generally more compact and easier to carry.

    Besides the weight and cord one problem I have with my larger glasses is the lens covers. Front and back they protect the lens from scratches so are needed but you need to keep them somewhere. You take them off to use the glasses and have to put them in a pocket or pouch or something which can be a little annoying. I looked at the Bushnell and the covers on the front lenses have little straps to hold them to the frame when not in place. Cool! And the back lenses? ….don’t, so they go into the pockets just like the more cumbersome glasses.

    To test out the visual quality of the glasses I took them and my larger pair to Valley Forge Park to compare them side by side at several vistas. Obviously the larger pair were going to be more powerful but I tested these by looking at something through the Bushnell’s, THEN switching to the Minolta’s to see what I had missed. There was not much lost in magnification. But I did discover something interesting. The compactness of the Bushnell’s made them less comfortable to hold and look through. There was a sense that I was being condensed. The larger Minoltas although heavier were much more comfortable to look through and easier to adjust.

    In the end the Bushnell’s are very good binoculars. Light, easy to carry and very good quality for the $70-$80 price range. I’m glad I have them but I won’t be replacing my larger set. I think where these will come in is if you are on a generic trip where you want binoculars as well as other stuff, such as a camping or fishing trip, this will be the item to reach for, BUT if I were doing something where the binoculars themselves are the chief item to be used, an afternoon’s bird watching, I’ll go with the larger but more comfortable pair.

    Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

    Was this review helpful to you? Yes
    No